Rotating Equipment Modularization

Rotating Equipment Modularization

Abstract

Fluor’s 3rd Gen Modular Execution℠ technology focuses on optimizing the layout of facilities and on moving a significant portion of site work to module yards in an attempt to reduce field labor costs. Fluor understands the unique set of challenges for modularizing rotating and reciprocating machinery.

Unlike conventional modules that are installed on a concrete foundation, rotating and reciprocating machinery is installed and supported by a steel structure. Steel used in modules has lower stiffness and damping than concrete, which necessitates the evaluation of structural response on the mounted machinery and implementation of special analytical and design measures.

Fluor’s patent pending approach to rotating equipment modularization targets the interface between the machinery baseplates and the supporting steel. By installation of steel chocks that have a self- leveling feature, the deformation of baseplates (bending, torsional twisting) due to deflection of modular steel can be eliminated.

The advantage of Fluor’s patent pending rotating equipment modularization is that it helps avoid the issue of equipment baseplate warping during transportation and the subsequent need at job sites to make rectifications and corrections to baseplates by machining. Secondly, the technology aims at precluding any possibility of permanent deflection at shaft ends, which can be very expensive and time consuming to restore. Lastly, it helps achieve reliable installation of machinery on structural steel modules.

Fluor’s approach to rotating equipment modularization helps to minimize craft field hours and reduce the total installed costs of the Client’s facility.

Client Benefits

Fluor’s approach to rotating equipment modularization benefits the Client by:

  • Complementing Fluor's 3rd Gen Modular Execution technology and contributing to the reliable installation of machinery on transportable steel modules.
  • Addressing the issue of equipment baseplate warping during transportation and helping to eliminate the need at job sites to make rectifications and corrections to baseplates by machining.
  • Aiming to preclude any possibility of permanent deflection at shaft ends, which can be very expensive and time consuming to restore.
  • Providing the guidelines and establishing acceptance criteria to assure reliable installation of machinery on structural steel modules.
  • Minimizing craft field hours on site and helping to reduce overall costs and improve project schedule.