Community Impact Report Q2 2017

Feature Story: Engineers Collaborate Across Borders to Bring Clean Water to El Salvador

Employees in Fluor's Aliso Viejo, California and Buenos Aires, Argentina, offices recently demonstrated their ingenuity while working with Engineers Without Borders to help three small villages in El Salvador retrieve clean water.

In El Salvador, nearly 90 percent of residents in the villages of El Rosario, Las Delicias and Las Animas purchase drinking water off a truck, depleting as much as 30 percent of their monthly income. Available water is mostly untreated, and many homes' storage tanks are uncovered. As a consequence, the residents often contract waterborne illnesses, which tragically can be lethal, especially to young children.

Engineers Without Borders asked a team of Fluor engineers to help create an efficient method for transferring drinking water from the well site to a network of storage tanks and distribution to homes. With the community members providing the labor to install the piping, a team of eight engineers – five from Aliso Viejo and three from Buenos Aires – volunteered time in the evenings and weekends to identify and design the necessary pumps, electrical and control systems.

Sixty kilometers of pipe were installed, four storage tanks constructed and three pumping stations built. The final phase of this project completed a 30-year effort to bring clean drinking water to the villages, benefiting more than 10,000 residents.

 

Engineers Without Borders team tests water quality

Engineers Without Borders team tests water quality

Aliso Viejo volunteer team

Aliso Viejo volunteer team

Winning team from Sevier Middle School

Winning team from Sevier Middle School

Rabbi Pesach Raymon Yeshiva wins grant

Rabbi Pesach Raymon Yeshiva wins grant

Partner Profile: Students Take on the Fluor Engineering Challenge; 10 Win Grants

Each year, Fluor and its employees participate in a variety of programs during Engineers Week, including the Friendly Competition. As part of Fluor's ongoing celebration, students around the world were invited to participate in the Fluor Engineering Challenge, developed in partnership with Science Buddies, an award-winning, web-based education nonprofit. "Phil it Up," the 2016 Fluor Friendly Competition designed by Manila's Team Wanbu, was adapted for the Fluor Engineering Challenge as an engaging experience for students.

"The Fluor Engineering Challenge is one of my favorite events to work on every year because of the clear and immediate impact it has on students," said Sandra Slutz, director of Science for Science Buddies. "This year's feedback from teachers and students has been overwhelmingly enthusiastic, with many describing the experience as both challenging and fun. To me, that is the highest of praise! The Challenge stretches the students to work on a novel problem that is just outside of their every-day comfort zone – it expands their horizons. Yet, they have fun doing it and, in the end, feel proud of their success and have a positive view of themselves as engineers and problem solvers."

The 2017 Fluor Engineering Challenge received more than 1,040 submissions, a 71 percent increase from last year, with more than 3,000 students participating from 11 different countries. Kindergarten through 12th grade students who completed the challenge and submitted results were entered into a random drawing to win one of 10 $1,000 grants for their qualifying community organizations or schools.

This year's grant winners are:

  • Southwest Glen Mission, Sugar Land, Texas
  • Sevier Middle School, Greenville, South Carolina
  • Kennedy High School, La Palma, California
  • Chinook Council Scouts, Calgary, Alberta
  • Los Alisos Intermediate, Mission Viejo, California
  • YBH of Passaic, Passaic, New Jersey
  • Rabbi Pesach Raymon Yeshiva, Edison, New Jersey
  • Ecole Victoria-Albert School, Winnipeg, Manitoba
  • De La Salle Santiago Zobel School, Muntinlupa, Philippines
  • Wisdom College, Brisbane, Australia

"We are dedicated to raising awareness about the engineering profession, and the Fluor Engineering Challenge allows students to get a glimpse of that world," said Torrence Robinson, senior director, Community & Public Affairs. "Thanks to our continued partnership with Science Buddies, we're able to share this fun and engaging program with students around the globe."

Fluor Cares Profile: Rising Against Hunger

For the third year, Fluor's Houston employees participated in a meal-packaging event. This year's event benefited Rise Against Hunger (formerly known as Stop Hunger Now), an international hunger relief agency whose mission is to end hunger in our lifetime by providing food and lifesaving aid to the world's most vulnerable populations.

In one hour, 16 teams made up of 164 volunteers worked together to pack 44,000 meals. Each team formed an assembly line, and team members added vitamins, rice, soy protein and dehydrated vegetables to a plastic bag, then passed it along for weight verification, sealing and boxing. Each packaged meal feeds six people and has a two-year shelf-life. The meals packed will benefit Nicaraguan communities.

"The Rise Against Hunger event is so important because we work to create thousands of meals for those who have very little means to feed their families," said Fluor Cares volunteer Ron Edmonds, a project business manager at Fluor. "I have children, and it would break my heart if I could not provide for them and they had to miss one or more meals. It's a fun team event, and I can't think of a better cause than one that feeds hungry families."

Over the last four years, the Houston office has packed more than 200,000 meals. In 2016, Fluor and its employees provided 671,000 meals to those in need.

Fluor Cares volunteers prepare to pack meals

Fluor Cares volunteers prepare to pack meals

Houston volunteer boxes completed meals

Houston volunteer boxes completed meals